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20100919
20100919
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and sustaining recovery. joining us in our panel today are pamela s. hyde, administrator, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland; dr. a. thomas mclennan, deputy director, white house office of national drug control policy, washington, d.c.; dr. alexandre laudet, addiction and recovery scientist, new york, new york; james smallwood, founder and ceo, the choice is yours, inc., camden, new jersey. pam, how many people in the united states are in recovery? well, the estimates are about 20 million people are in recovery, working on being free of drugs and other-and alcohol. and, alexandre, what is recovery? what are some of the common paths to recovery? well, that's really two different questions. what recovery is, according to people in recovery themselves, is usually, especially for people severely addicted, it is abstinence from drugs and alcohol, as well as significantly-significant improvements in other aspects that constitute quality of life, such as employment, social relationships, mental health, phys
>> good morning, everyone, and thank you for joining us. it is my pleasure to be here with our regional fta administrator and our commissioner from san francisco who sits on the metropolitan transportation commission. we have a new development in terms of the muni metro system, one of which is the beginning of the card installation system. we have nine stations that will be receiving newgate's. and we will be adding another 19 disabled fare gates. what we are attempting to do here is replace the infrastructure that has well tapped is useful life in terms of our fair gates, and we are cobbling that at the same time with a nuclear program, which you all should be aware of and which is the regional smart card that will be used throughout the area for public transit trips in the region. the new ticket vending machines -- we have purchased 40 of those ticket vending machines. customers should be able to go to any metro station and purchase tickets that can be used on all of the systems in the metro region. they are multi-lingual machines. they speak in english as well as spanish and
tunnel and detour road that will bring everybody who uses the oil and dive into safety by the middle of 2011. we are delighted to be able to use this opportunity. back in october, we had a ground-breaking ceremony for the project as a whole. we had the speaker of the house nancy pelosi with us. the mayor was here, other dignitaries. at the time, we were looking at the oil drive -- doyle drive. we now have a different project for the 21st century. it is an example of what partnership and inventiveness and the full participation of the amazing community of san francisco residents can do to create a project that is really worthy of the amazing natural setting of the presidio park, the largest urban park in the park system. let me start by making some acknowledgements. we have some speakers who i will introduced in a moment, but i am very pleased to welcome to the event, dan representing the speaker's office. i would also like to have very much thank christine from senator feinstein's office, as well as mega miller, a field representative team for senator boxer. in that knowledge and the
at the occupant load and how many people are going to have to use this, and the building code has a table for calculating. i think we would look at home people would using it. >> every fire escape balcony 18 inches. >> i wanted to talk to the about the stand pipe. >> tell us what we got here. >> this is a dry stamp pipe. typically, the fire engine would stop here and hook up here. so on any floor, whichever floor, we can have water. like i say, this is even better than going to the building. our guy does a good job and makes sure the balcony is stable. it's so much nicer to be outside. you yell at the guy. we need more water and pressure. in my eyes, it's a better system. this one here is dry. some of them are wet. >> what's the difference between wet and dry? >> wet would be connected to the water system. typically on a smaller building, they would use this as their riser to be their sprinkler system inside. it's wet. it has 60, 65 pounds of pressure. it isn't really enough to fight the fire. but we already have water. we would still need the engine to hook up to get water pressure we ne
with us. their lives have been enhanced because of the stimulus project. it was noted $100 million or more with the tiger grant got us a year ahead of schedule. in 2013 this will be done. what an extraordinary thing. this is right around the corner. this is real time construction and real leadership. thank you, speaker policy. thank you, barbara boxer. thank you, senator feinstein. thank you to jake mgoldrick. we had regional projects related to work on celebrity -- collectively together. he helped organize a from work with the golden gate bridge district and other leaders throughout the region. patching together money, patching together collaboration, patching together those wounds that have opened up in the course of this project. in closing, i think you not only for your introduction but for your stewardship and leadership and constancy. thank you for your faith, love, and devotion. this is one of the things i know you care deeply about. that showed throughout the course of this effort and the course of the work that is being done here. thank you very much. [applause] >> i remember then
their technical assistance as we engage the communities around the sig. new day off helps us think about the community's schools approach. we have continued to attend their functions and to get one on one support making sure we approach that. >> last night, we attended a meeting and committed to knocking on doors. we also committed to having epc come out to the bayview zone to help. a lot of the things you are saying we did not mention in detail. president kim: the board is just hungry for all this information. we want more and more. [applause] -- [laughter] i think that is it for now in terms of questions. thank you so much for the presentation. are there more questions and comments from staff? >> i just wanted to clarify -- are the superintendent zones schools mainly in mission and bayview, or does it struck out two different districts? >> they are mainly in the bayview and mission, but we have two schools that are not -- john muir and paul revere. commissioner yee: could i follow up on my question about the cross pollination? >> we absolutely decided to do that back in june. we have n
has a mental health issue or substance use issue needs to also get a good physical health assessment. one of the things we know about the misuse of alcohol or drugs is that it does have an effect on the organic integrity of the body. so you may get liver disease, you may get gastritis, you may get heart disease, you're at greater risks for various infections like hepatitis c or hiv. and we want to make sure that anybody who is on the course of recovery has as much information as possible. there was one quote i read recently and a guy says, "i spent all this time using alcohol and drugs and shooting up, etc., etc., so i finally get into treatment only to discover that i have hepatitis c." so we want to have that as an integral part because that becomes part of the cultural dynamic. and especially from a religious point of view, because you start feeling that you've been visited by god in a negative way because after all, you finally get your life on a proper course, and boom, you've got to deal with either hiv or you've got to deal with the hepatitides. and when you are dealing with t
have ramifications. there are some ways that will help us to define our extended learning model as well as developing summer bridge academies for our kindergarten students, as well as readiness for grade 5 making transition to 6 and great 8 making transition to nine. >> are overarching goal is that all of our students meet their academic targets. >> in order to do all of this work -- how? what are the means? we have already launched dedicated superintendent zone at teams by reorganizing centrally to be more in schools directly. we are working carefully with school principals and communities to assure given their priorities that there are budgets and resources available to them -- personnel, money, and time aligned to those priorities. we expect that our school improvement grant application will result in the $45 million and have often recommended, which will help directly support 10 of our 15 schools in the zone. we continue to be aggressive about pursuing external grant funding. we have already been successful with a couple of significant grants with the support of the alliance
into a refinery and we can use it again. they do oil changes and sell it anyway, so now they know when a ticket to a. hal>> to you have something you want to get rid of? >> why throw it away when you can reuse it? >> it can be filtered out and used for other products. >> [speaking spanish] >> it is going to be a good thing for us to take used motor oil from customers. we have a 75-gallon tank that we used and we have someone take it from here to recycle. >> so far, we have 35 people. we have collected 78 gallons, if not more. these are other locations that you can go. it is absolutely free. you just need to have the location open. you are set to go. >> we thought we wouldd< take ts weekly video out on the road. we are here at recology at the recycling center. if you ever wondered where your recyclables go, and this new mandate for composting, the new challenges and mandates around recycling, what we are trying to achieve -- it all starts right here. we just marked an important milestone in our city. i would argue important this nationn francisco has now achieved a 77% diversion rate, the highes
for the health that it gives. so it seemed to be a natural plant to share. >> though they may look the same to us, there are actually about 400 varieties of cacti, and while not all are edible, john does grow an edible variety called nopalea grande. during peak season, he is shipping upwards of 3,000 pounds of the plant at a time, and while some go to pet-food stores for tortoises to enjoy, most of the plants here are used for human consumption. so john has a grading system he uses when harvesting. >> we have several different grades, depending on what the consumer wants. this is grade-a, tender, beautiful, exquisite, baby-vegetable cactus, shipped with ultimate care in packing. this would be grade-b, also for the gourmand, but a little larger. not as much packing material in there to protect it. this is a good grace-c, very good for the ultimate consumer, easy to prepare and clean. you've got a lot of food value per leaf. >> grown on hillsides with plenty of sun and well-drained soil, the plants love to grow close together, and from planting to harvest, it can take months even years tc get full
misconceptions' because we are not doing our part to help change it. if that is true, i want jerry to tell us whether or not he agrees with that assessment. >> do you agree with that? >> jonathan said something that i absolutely agree with. that is the media reflects what the public wants. in my view, the media, in general, feed a voracious appetite for vengeance by an informed public. often influenced by fear, prejudice, and ignorance. i think one of the reasons criminal defense lawyers argued so poorly is people do not understand the source of crime. they want simple, quick responses to a complited long- term solutions. you cannot fight crime by doing what the governor is doing, cutting social services and building new prisons. [applause] you do not have to be a rocket scientist to understand. all of us who have been involved in the criminal-justice system know where people who commit crimes come from. they are poor people, people of color, victims of abuse, the mentally ill, people with substance abuse problems. there are the people that fall through the cracks of society. but that is the
justice and all that, it is meaningful to folks like us, but it does not play all that well with people who are afraid of crime, people who are out of work. part of the message has to become it seems to me, going back to the sources of crime, not from an economic point of view, if you want to save money, you should do things that effectively will fight crime, as opposed to making you feel tougher and stronger. also, if you can get part of the message out that it is a tragedy when anyone is wrongfully convicted, for that person, for their family and friends, but the other part is, if there are wrongfully convicted, there is somebody out there who is actually the criminal. part of the message has to be financial. we have been told for years people vote with their pocketbooks, so you have to make a financial analysis. i am certain it would save an enormous amount of money. it also have to get people to understand by making the criminal justice system work, you make yourself safer. not just by feeding your ego or feeding your prejudice, let's get them, let's get them. you never
kim was not able to be there. but the two of us as the quorum of the committee recommended to the board that at the next meeting, that the board support the substitute motion that will take the place of the first reading, the first draft of this policy. the substitute motion will include those slightly amended elementary school attendance areas and the policy language that talks about the phasing in of the middle school feeder patterns not this year, but that we will use middle school assignment mechanisms for the coming year, which will just take out the feeder patterns, and we will have fewer steps and tie-breakers. so essentially it will be more of a choice system for middle school next year, an open choice system for the whole district, more like what we are using now. we should remind people, as we did last night, that the middle school process has been the one that has had the highest positive results for students, parents and families in recent years. that is, percentage just under or over 90% of participants have gotten one of their choices in the middle school proc
will be talking about diversity issues within the addiction and recovery field. joining us in our panel today are dr. h. westley clark, director, center for substance abuse treatment, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland. marco e. jacome, chief executive officer, healthcare alternative systems incorporated, chicago, illinois. john de miranda, president and ceo, stepping stone, san diego, california. william lossiah-bratt, board of directors, southeastern regional representative, faces and voices of recovery, cherokee, north carolina. dr. clark, why should we be concerned about ethnic and racial differences within the addiction and recovery field, as well as other differences? well, one of the things that we want to make sure is that people who have substance use problems are able to recover and that materials that we use can assist them in that process. and so, you know, there are differences associated with cultural values and beliefs, starting from how one physiologically responds to a particular substan
about the program is the way it is set out allows us to treat the artworks that have the most need, the ones that our conservative have pointed out as the most vulnerable as opposed to ones that might be the most popular were the most miserable -- the most visible. >> it is an opportunity for the public to get involved with these art works located in their backyard and ultimately belong to them. >> i want to do something for the community, just giving back what the community has done for me. it is corny to say, but it is true. it really is what it is. that i would be able to see more pieces cleanup. >>" will check back in the future and see the fruits of conservation and revitalization efforts. if you would find out more or donate to the art carethe artsfartcommission.org. >> hello, i'm meg, welcome to "culture wire." for this episode, the director of cultural affairs, luis, will take you on a journey through presidio has been tet. -- presidio habitat. >> welcome to "culture wire." today i'm at the presidio trust, a treasure within san francisco, because the presidio trust is reall
. the only of us who can get it are people with health insurance. anyone will tell you on the street we need residential drug treatment. take some of these dam presence, take down the gun towers, turned into a residential drug treatment centers -- some of these damned prisons. >> what are your suggestions as to the reform? one area we have not really talked about much is the impact of technology. where is that going now, and how do we need to expend that? how do we deal with the information that is being disseminated, how do we slow that down? are there other areas that also are bleeding into employment and housing, and what is the solution, is my question? he>> there has been a real leadership on the country to come up with smarter ideas, and we have had a lot of good examples and policies, state and federal for the past 10 years or so, so the reform agenda is not that big a secret. they have been a lot of reports that put it together in one place. i think the real challenge that has been touched on is really leadership, and a lot of it has to do with leadership and people really stepping u
have been using and drinking for 30 or 40 years. mind you, detoxing programs like that is a necessity. but they need to have some place else that they can fall back on to-to-to make that foundation strong. the benefit in being at chase and the reason why we're successful is that we help that foundation get strong through the peer-on-peer, through the meetings, through the groups, through the interaction. we-we pretty much do everything together. one thing that helps me maintain my recovery is working at chase. it keeps me fresh. i see the guys, their struggles, and it reminds me of me, many, many years ago. peer-to-peer recovery service, i think, is really the only way that things can work for a person who doesn't have any knowledge about what it's like to deal with day-to-day stresses without some type of drug or-or alcohol. when you have others that have experienced some of the challenges and have made it through without pickin' up, you have a chance to talk to somebody about it before you make a decision one way or the other about how to handle the situation. yeah, if you look back
with amy and if you can tell us what is "ordinary injustice" and how does it manifest itself? >> ordinary injustice happens in a courtroom where there are smart, committed, hard-working people, professionals. but they are routinely acting in ways that fall short. what it is that people and their positions are supposed to be doing. and they don't even realize that anything is missing or that their behavior has devastating consequences for regular people's lives. so this is really the meaning of ordinary injustice that mistakes become routine and the legal professionals can no longer see their role in them. >> can you give us some examples of what you found in your eight-year saga of studying the court system? >> sure. the best way to perhaps get into it is to tell you how i first came across it. i had just graduated law school from stanford and i had clerked for a federal appellate judge in miami and the jurisdiction was florida, alabama and georgia and i wrote a story after my clerkship for the "nation" magazine and it was picked up everywhere. they said if you can do this again, we'll gi
. across the street was the confederate cemetery. from the courthouse, they flew two flags -- the u.s. flag and the confederate battle flag, which was the state flag of south carolina. from the court room, i could look out the window and seaport sumter in the distance -- see fort sumter. they put me on a case with no marijuana. they invented imaginary marijuana. they said i was charged with conspiring to contribute 10 tons of colombian marijuana. i pled not guilty. i had a jury trial. i was found guilty on one account, acquitted on nine. i had an appellate case and the supreme court case. i was then facing 15 years. since may to nine. when i went to federal prison, i did time in eight different states in nine different federal prisons, including four penitentiaries -- that is a maximum security. including the united states penitentiary at marion, the first super federal max. that is on a marijuana convention. -- conviction. i spent most of my time in solitary confinement. you do not know this, but if you plead not duty and you get a jury trial and then you have an appellate case, you go dir
that this school board, all of administration, all of us have been working on foor a long time and it's exciting to be able to present that this evening so you get an understanding of what's going to be different, where we're going, what are the thoughts behind doing something like this. and we believe that in looking at our data, by focusing in a little bit more and having the support that schools have to have in order to be successful, by developing these two zones in our areas that need the most assistance, because that's where our persistently low-performing schools are at. we need to intervene, we need to do something, and we can't wait any longer. even though they've shown phenomenal growth, i want to give a little shout-out to malcolm x. because malcolm x elementary school, believe it or not, has an a.p.i. score of 800 this year. applause plause so they've grown by over 200 in two years. [applause] so it can be done. for those who don't believe it can't be done, get out of the way. because we at san francisco unified, we're getting it by the help of everybody. so i'm excited to do this pr
to the prosecutors, he had never seen a case that has seen more of use in his career. attorney general holder was right in terms of acting swiftly, in terms of throwing out that condition. he also stated that the department of justice's office of professional responsibility would investigate the actions of the two officers, yet a year after that, we still have heard nothing out of office regarding their conduct. the department of justice has publicly talked about how they increased training in terms of discovery obligations, and they have issued memos in terms of what they are supposed to be doing, yet they have yet to do anything regarding the behavior of those prosecutors. contrast that to the case that occurred a couple years ago, that boasts -- that of the prosecutor in north carolina, where six months after the charges were brought against the lacrosse students, and they were charged with rape, the defense attorneys uncovered evidence in the files, and north carolina is open, but they found evidence in the files showing their clients were innocent. the state attorney general immediately
should always be proud of what it is that we do for people and in fact, what they return to us. we are made better by the work that we do and may god bless all of your efforts. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, jose. the event today is also sponsored by the california attorneys for criminal justice. i also want to especially thank the rosenberg foundation and executive director tim solard who provided a grant to make this possible so thank you so much the rosenberg foundation and of course i want to thank all the volunteers who worked so hard to make this event happen today. now i'm very excited to introduce our keynote speaker. our keynote speaker is and was the first "lady lawyer" in california. it's true. because when she decided that she wanted to become a lawyer, there was one problem, the law in california didn't allow it. and so she had to change the law, which she did. she also wanted to go to law school right here at hastings college of law but they had a policy that said only men could go do that law school so she sued hastings college of the law and she changed that an
it over, and the judges were telling us, you are making a mountain out of a molehill. little did we know there was all this bubbling underneath, so it is true the onus of the burden is on the defense, because once we have the information we have to file the motion. it is a tremendous amount of work we have to do, but what we need to do is make sure there is a process so people who were convicted can bring their cases back to court. our next question from the audience says, in santa clara county when people plead guilty to misdemeanors, what happened? did they go to jail? for how long? what type of crimes? >> one of the chief dynamics that was happening was that many people were faced with a choice between staying in jail sometimes up to a week or even longer waiting for a public defender to get to their case for just to get out right fair, -- right there, because the judge was basically saying, plead guilty. what is the big deal? that was the impression. everybody was taking the deal. you could almost see them talking to each other. you could see them make that decision. any pointed out
for that in 1950 mission, and then a smaller parcel on page street. it's our hope that we can make maximum use of those two parcels by actually creating housing on those. and the union has sat with mr. golden and some consultants who came in and explained how you can lease one and put up a few units, but we believe there are also non-profit folks who can come in and show you how we can do a maximum number of units on both of those pieces of land, and we hope that you remain open to that and we hope that we can put up educator housing so that we can offer a ray of hope to these couple of hundred new people next year that we will be bringing up, a place for them to perhaps stay for a while or forever, or a way to make it possible for them to come and work and settle in san francisco. thank you very much. >> thank you, mr. kelly. president kim: actually, educator housing will be on the agendas for next tuesday, the second agenda item after special ed, so it will be later. but you can also come and comment at that time because the entire board will be getting the same presentation that you got. it
some good legislation has been put in place where there is a formula retail conditional use in that particular area, so that chain stores will have a high bar in order to get in, in that area. we try to make it mom and pop driven sensitive. we want to see -- i'd like to see certainly more, you know, just kind of independent businesses going in in that area. >> it is a residential street. it is in the midst of a residential neighborhood. and i think there is a general and overwhelming consensus that the commercial activities on haight street should be small, contained, and as here as possible as is economically possible, which is not very economically possible as neighborhood serving as possible. unfortunately, the market forces in this part of the world are immensely strong. and what we're seeing is more and more speciality retail on haight street. >> hayes valley is certainly impacted by its proximity to both our seat of government and our performing arts institutions. we're very fortunate to be located right on the boundary of both of those wonderful resources. and certain
, they are going to find value with it and use it and be productive with it every day. and half of the city's population that's in the other boat is disconnected from all that potential prosperity. >> we really need to promote content and provide applications that are really relevant to people's lives here. so a lot of the inspiration, especially among the immigrant community, we see is communications with people from their home country but we as much want to use the internet as a tool for people to connect within the local san francisco community. >> i think it's our job as public educators to give them this access and give them this opportunity to see that their efforts are being appreciated beyond their immediate reach. >> you have to blend this idea of community network with computer equipment with training and with support. we can pull all that together, then we've got it. >> it's as much about social and economic justice -- in fact it's more about social and economic justice than just >> i work with the department of environment and we are recycling oil. thank you. we can go into a re
in san francisco to solve the problem with it's unique, vertically challenged terrain. we are still using cars a century old >> the old cable car is the most unique thing, it's still going. it was a good design by then and is still now. if we don't do something now. it's going to be worse later. >> the cable cars are built the same as they were in the late 1800's. we use a modern machinery. we haven't changed a thing. it's just how we get there. >> it's a time consuming job. we go for the quality rather than the production. we take pride in our work and it shows in the end product. >> the california line is mostly locals. the commuters in the morning, i see a lot of the same people. we don't have as tourists. we are coming up to street to chinatown. since 1957, we are the only city in the world that runs cable cars. these cars right here are part of national parks system. in the early 1960's, they became the first roles monument. the way city spread changed with the invention of the cable car. >> people know in san francisco, first thing they think about is, let's go
not a modest increase in the use and utilization of bicycles once the bike lane has been put in, but a huge increase. talking anywhere from 200% to 300% increase in the use of bicycles once these bike lanes are established. we can conservatively estimate, and these are the numbers that the agency uses, that we would see a 50% increase in the utilization of bicycles when we paid -- as we stripe these bike lanes. you see that with the ability to enhance, and now, you see the enhancements, and that ability is going to follow and i think exceeded everyone's expectations. world-class city is a city that tries to democratize its streets, sidewalks, plazas, playgrounds, public realms. world-class cities now are competing for the best and brightest, and they understand the quality of life is that one differentiated that establishes those that will be the leaders 5, 10, 15, 25 years from now. san francisco does not want to see its world-class status. -- does not want to cede its world-class status. means we have to be a city that is friendly to bicyclist. it means we have to restate that
us the next time as we profile another one of san francisco's great neighborhoods. until then, i'm jennifer lowe for sfg tv. thanks for watching. . >> my name is mark tieman and i'm senior councilor at pet camp, san francisco, california. we dispose of a lot of carbon-based material here, dog poop, and the more we can turn that into something viable, the better off we are. in san francisco there's more dogs than children. finding a viable use for dog poop. >> proenvironmental policies, that's a way to win hearts and that's a way to win hearts and minds. [horns honking] [siren wails] announcer: big dreams and goodrades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone who can help is the first and most important. for the next steps, go to knowhow2go.org. richie! yo, tye! what-up? richie! what-up, player? how ya doing, son? all right, man. i'm chillin', of course. click freedomcenter.org to find yours.
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)